Risk of food allergies

In this discussion you will have a chance to articulate your viewpoint on the topic of whether or not early introduction of foods reduces the risk of food allergies and provide the evidence to support AND refute the opposing opinion. You will need to search the School library databases for evidence to support your points i.e. find a peer-reviewed journal article that provides such evidence. In a post of 175 – 200 words Articulate your points and supportive statements clearly and succinctly. Approach this as though you are preparing for a debate and will have a strict time limit to make your points. APA 7th gen format including in text citations. MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS IN A MODERN WORLD A RECORD NUMBER OF KIDS AND ADULTS ARE IN DANGER OF SUFFERING SERIOUS ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO EVERYDAY FOODS THE REST OF US EAT WITHOUT A SECOND THOUGHT. HERES HOW TO BE A GOOD NEIGHBOR AND MAKE OUR SHARED SPACES SAFE AND FUN FOR EVERYONE YOURE WATCHING YOUR KID at the playground waiting at jury duty or stuck on a commuter train and—after some audible stomach growls—you grab a nutty snack bar from your bag and rip it open. Maybe you feel a twinge of guilt: You just read a Facebook post from a mom whose kid has a deadly nut allergy. Squelching the passing thought you wolf down the bar considerately ensuring no crumbs get left on a public surface. But shouldnt you do the neighborly thing and not carry a snack that while harmless to you could kick off a dangerous reaction in someone else? You may be surprised to learn that many doctors and educated food allergy families dont expect the world to change how it eats—and wouldnt expect you to stop carrying around your favorite energy bar. (Though many schools do institute rules to keep allergic kids safe—more on that later.) These situations can be “highly nuanced and emotional” says David Stukus MD a pediatric allergist at Nationwide Childrens Hospital in Columbus Ohio. “They require careful discussion of actual versus perceived risk shared decision-making and education surrounding food allergen exposure.” If we understood more about the science and everyday reality of living with food allergies we might be a little kinder a little more inclusive and a little more willing to take small steps that could help. A GROWING YET INVISIBLE SCOURGE An estimated 32 million Americans are living with food allergies—about 5.6 million are under age 18—and cases are rising here and around the world. Airlines are required to allow passengers with severe food allergies to preboard so they can wipe down surfaces around their seats and many schools reserve lunch tables for allergic kids. In January the FDA approved the first food allergy treatment: a set of daily capsules that can make the immune system less reactive to peanuts over time. And at least 15 more companies are developing remedies including vaccines probiotics and even a toothpaste. While these therapies could bring relief they are not cures. Allergic individuals still need to watch what they eat and carry epinephrine for emergency reactions. Despite increased attention to this global health concern many families with food allergies feel overlooked or misunderstood. Unlike say cat allergies or seasonal allergies which can usually be managed with readily available over-the-counter and prescription treatments food allergies can require years of self-education and experimentation to find a system that works. Gwen Smith founder of the news website Allergic Living first suspected she had food allergies in her 30s when she got hives after eating shrimp. By the time a friend drove her to a hospital less than 10 minutes away “I could barely breathe” Smith says. “They had the crash cart and my blood pressure was dropping.” After getting diagnosed with shellfish and soy allergies she realized shed had symptoms before—but she had mistaken them for signs of the flu food poisoning or stomach trouble. “Now I know to think “How long ago did I eat? Could this be related?”” People with food allergies produce antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE) which can trigger a range of symptoms including digestive problems itching hives wheezing and sometimes life-threatening anaphylactic shock. The risk of getting a severe reaction can provoke anxiety says Corinne Keet MD PhD a pediatric allergist-immunologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. For many parents guarding against these reactions in their food-allergic children is a daily task. “Everything was a scrutiny for us” says Nina Aggarwal of Foster City California whose 8-year-old had an anaphylactic reaction to an egg during infancy. “We had to read every label. I would pack him a picnic everywhere we went. It was very isolating.” Alicia Bales of Los Angeles remembers discovering her 2-year-olds food allergies and feeling like no one else was worried. “It felt like my sons diagnosis was invisible” she says. “I could watch him really carefully all the time but I didnt think other people would be as careful.” Feeling left out or different can hurt allergic kids emotional well-being says Tamara Hubbard a licensed clinical professional counselor in Long Grove Illinois and the founder of the website Food Allergy Counselor which offers mental health resources and a national directory of food-allergy-informed counselors. Compared with their nonallergic peers children with food allergies are 25 percent more likely to be bullied at school and they more often show symptoms of isolation depression and anxiety according to a 2018 study in the Journal for Nurse Practitioners. Sometimes teachers neighbors and other well-meaning individuals flat-out misunderstand the situation. After hearing about her sons food allergies Aggarwal says “everyone will just be like “No peanut no peanut.” They dont think about other allergens.” (Her son does fine with peanuts but has allergies to tree nuts and kiwis as well as eggs.) Cultural and generational differences in perspective are also hard to resolve. Depending on where and when someone grew up “maybe they didnt hear about food allergies that often” Hubbard says. Even when people mean to be helpful she adds many “dont seem to understand the seriousness.” That may be because food allergies change the family dynamic. In many families “someone expresses love for someone else by stuffing their face with food” Bales says. Her son is allergic to dairy eggs tree nuts and some seeds. “After the diagnosis suddenly these foods were associated with fear instead of comfort illness instead of nourishment” she says. “Its where a lot of my emotional distress came from.” HOW TO BE A FOOD ALLERGY ALLY Parents and doctors say one of the best ways to help is to simply acknowledge the emotional toll that managing food allergies can take on a family—especially the kids. Just a bit of support can greatly impact families with food allergies and decrease the fear they may feel Hubbard says. IN SCHOOL Notice who is not eating. Rachael Becker of Austin Texas was touched when another mom asked her if her son had food allergies after observing that he never ate the snack served at the after-school math program. The mom then made allergy-safe brownies for the whole group using egg and dairy substitutes. “She told me all the ingredients so I would feel comfortable and she sent me photos of everything” Becker says. “It was such a lovely gesture and one I wont forget. Neither will my son. He had never gotten to enjoy a brownie before and loved eating it.” Lead with empathy. Some parents may feel annoyed when one kids allergy dictates what the entire class can have for a snack. “Just remember this is probably one of 10 to 20 times this week I will have to figure something out related to allergies” says Kaia Mahlke of Victoria Minnesota whose son is allergic to peanuts tree nuts eggs peas and lentils. “When someone makes one of those times easier for us it is so appreciated.” Listen look and learn. Aggarwal arms herself with photos and facts to make food allergies relatable. Her sons school had a policy of storing medications only in the office. To persuade the staff to keep her sons asthma inhaler and epinephrine autoinjector in the classroom Aggarwal presented concrete scenarios—for example what if he had an allergic reaction or began wheezing during an extended lockdown? She also showed photos of her sons hives and swollen eyes after he accidentally touched mayonnaise. “That garnered empathy from teachers” Aggarwal says. “They were like “Oh my God that looks very scary.”” Seek out opportunities to educate. If you volunteer in the classroom make an effort to learn about the unique situation of each child with a food allergy Aggarwal suggests. “Be the liaison who coordinates food-related activities at class parties and emails the class about allergens and safe brands and products.” Become the cafeteria lunch buddy. Even if a childs school reserves a lunch table for kids with allergies it doesnt mean they dont feel alone or different. “This is my daughters first year eating lunch at school” says Ellen Polston of Rocky River Ohio. “The moms of two of her friends decided to not pack my daughters allergens in their daughters lunches so she would always have friends to sit next to.” AT PARTIES AND PLAYDATES Share the menu ahead of time. “Other families have been so supportive by notifying us about what foods will be served at birthday parties—not so we do or dont go based on our allergens but so I can send along an appropriate replacement” says Katie Price of Portland Oregon. “Im so grateful when friends give me the heads-up so we can prepare and my 4-year-old son doesnt feel left out.” Offer one safe snack. “This happens disappointingly rarely and can be as simple as changing the snack to one the allergic child can eat” says Christine Anna a New York City mom whose son is allergic to dairy tree nuts and sunflower seeds. “It makes such a difference for our children to feel included.” Hand out nonfood treats. Many schools have already banned or heavily restricted food at school parties. If yours has not consider replacing food-based prizes with puzzles stickers and small toys. This is particularly helpful if multiple kids have different food allergies says Nili Patel a mom of two in Raleigh North Carolina. ON PLAYGROUNDS AND AIRPLANES Wash hands and wipe tables after eating. This could help protect others from accidentally exposing themselves to food allergens through crumbs and oils—especially people with so many allergies that its hard to avoid all problematic foods says Amy DiElsi of Malvern Pennsylvania whose son is allergic to wheat eggs milk peanuts tree nuts and sesame. (This habit is of course good protection against viruses bacteria and irritants as well.) Another tip: Teach your kids to eat at designated tables rather than on playground equipment. ONE IN 10 U.S. ADULTS HAVE A FOOD ALLERGY. More than 25 percent said they werent allergic to foods as children. ONE IN 13 U.S. KIDS UNDER AGE 18 HAVE A FOOD ALLERGY. Thats almost 8 percent of all children in the country. THE RATE OF FOOD ALLERGIES AMONG KIDS HAS DOUBLED in the last two decades. PREVENT ALLERGIES WITH EARLY INTRODUCTION Parents used to be advised not to feed babies peanut products and other top allergens until age 1 or 2. But in the past five years large rigorous clinical trials have shown that early introduction of peanuts reduces the chance of developing an allergy; other trials support the early introduction of eggs and milk. These findings “turned everything upside down” says Erika Cravanas MD a pediatrician in Louisville Kentucky. Now she and other doctors urge parents to feed babies peanut products and other potential allergens early and consistently starting as young as 4 to 6 months. This is an especially good move for babies with egg allergies or eczema who are at high risk of developing more allergies. If the eczema is severe though consult a doctor to make sure your child doesnt already have a particular food allergy before you introduce the allergen says Hugh A. Sampson MD an allergist and professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. SEE A FOOD ALLERGY EXPERT Blood and skin-prick tests can be tricky to interpret. About half the time the tests “could be positive but if you actually ate the food you wouldnt react” says allergist Tina Sindher MD clinical assistant professor of allergy and immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine. This can make people cut out foods needlessly. Bottom line: Find an informed allergist to help you navigate the diagnosis. USE DISCRETION WITH SOCIAL MEDIA Support groups can be beneficial. But since theyre often populated by people who need help you may not hear as much from people who are successfully managing their food allergies and doing well says Sakina Bajowala MD of Kaneland Allergy & Asthma Center in North Aurora Illinois. “You are more likely to get a bit of a skewed perspective because you tend to see worst-case scenarios.” EXPLORE TREATMENT OPTIONS Oral immunotherapy (OIT) involves ingesting a culprit food such as peanuts eggs tree nuts milk wheat or shellfish daily to desensitize immune cells. The only FDA-approved food allergy treatment—Aimmune Therapeutics peanut-flour capsules called Palforzia—is a form of OIT. A small number of allergists have developed OIT regimens using commercial food products. For some families gaining the ability to safely eat one or two peanuts for example can be transformative. Before her daughters did OIT Jessika Welcome of San Carlos California says they had to “stay away from any food labels that said “may contain” or “made on shared equipment”—which rules out a lot of stuff.” After OIT they “could ignore those warnings. It opened up Halloween in a whole different way.” MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS IN A MODERN WORLD A RECORD NUMBER OF KIDS AND ADULTS ARE IN DANGER OF SUFFERING SERIOUS ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO EVERYDAY FOODS THE REST OF US EAT WITHOUT A SECOND THOUGHT. HERES HOW TO BE A GOOD NEIGHBOR AND MAKE OUR SHARED SPACES SAFE AND FUN FOR EVERYONE YOURE WATCHING YOUR KID at the playground waiting at jury duty or stuck on a commuter train and—after some audible stomach growls—you grab a nutty snack bar from your bag and rip it open. Maybe you feel a twinge of guilt: You just read a Facebook post from a mom whose kid has a deadly nut allergy. Squelching the passing thought you wolf down the bar considerately ensuring no crumbs get left on a public surface. But shouldnt you do the neighborly thing and not carry a snack that while harmless to you could kick off a dangerous reaction in someone else? You may be surprised to learn that many doctors and educated food allergy families dont expect the world to change how it eats—and wouldnt expect you to stop carrying around your favorite energy bar. (Though many schools do institute rules to keep allergic kids safe—more on that later.) These situations can be “highly nuanced and emotional” says David Stukus MD a pediatric allergist at Nationwide Childrens Hospital in Columbus Ohio. “They require careful discussion of actual versus perceived risk shared decision-making and education surrounding food allergen exposure.” If we understood more about the science and everyday reality of living with food allergies we might be a little kinder a little more inclusive and a little more willing to take small steps that could help. A GROWING YET INVISIBLE SCOURGE An estimated 32 million Americans are living with food allergies—about 5.6 million are under age 18—and cases are rising here and around the world. Airlines are required to allow passengers with severe food allergies to preboard so they can wipe down surfaces around their seats and many schools reserve lunch tables for allergic kids. In January the FDA approved the first food allergy treatment: a set of daily capsules that can make the immune system less reactive to peanuts over time. And at least 15 more companies are developing remedies including vaccines probiotics and even a toothpaste. While these therapies could bring relief they are not cures. Allergic individuals still need to watch what they eat and carry epinephrine for emergency reactions. Despite increased attention to this global health concern many families with food allergies feel overlooked or misunderstood. Unlike say cat allergies or seasonal allergies which can usually be managed with readily available over-the-counter and prescription treatments food allergies can require years of self-education and experimentation to find a system that works. Gwen Smith founder of the news website Allergic Living first suspected she had food allergies in her 30s when she got hives after eating shrimp. By the time a friend drove her to a hospital less than 10 minutes away “I could barely breathe” Smith says. “They had the crash cart and my blood pressure was dropping.” After getting diagnosed with shellfish and soy allergies she realized shed had symptoms before—but she had mistaken them for signs of the flu food poisoning or stomach trouble. “Now I know to think “How long ago did I eat? Could this be related?”” People with food allergies produce antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE) which can trigger a range of symptoms including digestive problems itching hives wheezing and sometimes life-threatening anaphylactic shock. The risk of getting a severe reaction can provoke anxiety says Corinne Keet MD PhD a pediatric allergist-immunologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. For many parents guarding against these reactions in their food-allergic children is a daily task. “Everything was a scrutiny for us” says Nina Aggarwal of Foster City California whose 8-year-old had an anaphylactic reaction to an egg during infancy. “We had to read every label. I would pack him a picnic everywhere we went. It was very isolating.” Alicia Bales of Los Angeles remembers discovering her 2-year-olds food allergies and feeling like no one else was worried. “It felt like my sons diagnosis was invisible” she says. “I could watch him really carefully all the time but I didnt think other people would be as careful.” Feeling left out or different can hurt allergic kids emotional well-being says Tamara Hubbard a licensed clinical professional counselor in Long Grove Illinois and the founder of the website Food Allergy Counselor which offers mental health resources and a national directory of food-allergy-informed counselors. Compared with their nonallergic peers children with food allergies are 25 percent more likely to be bullied at school and they more often show symptoms of isolation depression and anxiety according to a 2018 study in the Journal for Nurse Practitioners. Sometimes teachers neighbors and other well-meaning individuals flat-out misunderstand the situation. After hearing about her sons food allergies Aggarwal says “everyone will just be like “No peanut no peanut.” They dont think about other allergens.” (Her son does fine with peanuts but has allergies to tree nuts and kiwis as well as eggs.) Cultural and generational differences in perspective are also hard to resolve. Depending on where and when someone grew up “maybe they didnt hear about food allergies that often” Hubbard says. Even when people mean to be helpful she adds many “dont seem to understand the seriousness.” That may be because food allergies change the family dynamic. In many families “someone expresses love for someone else by stuffing their face with food” Bales says. Her son is allergic to dairy eggs tree nuts and some seeds. “After the diagnosis suddenly these foods were associated with fear instead of comfort illness instead of nourishment” she says. “Its where a lot of my emotional distress came from.” HOW TO BE A FOOD ALLERGY ALLY Parents and doctors say one of the best ways to help is to simply acknowledge the emotional toll that managing food allergies can take on a family—especially the kids. Just a bit of support can greatly impact families with food allergies and decrease the fear they may feel Hubbard says. IN SCHOOL Notice who is not eating. Rachael Becker of Austin Texas was touched when another mom asked her if her son had food allergies after observing that he never ate the snack served at the after-school math program. The mom then made allergy-safe brownies for the whole group using egg and dairy substitutes. “She told me all the ingredients so I would feel comfortable and she sent me photos of everything” Becker says. “It was such a lovely gesture and one I wont forget. Neither will my son. He had never gotten to enjoy a brownie before and loved eating it.” Lead with empathy. Some parents may feel annoyed when one kids allergy dictates what the entire class can have for a snack. “Just remember this is probably one of 10 to 20 times this week I will have to figure something out related to allergies” says Kaia Mahlke of Victoria Minnesota whose son is allergic to peanuts tree nuts eggs peas and lentils. “When someone makes one of those times easier for us it is so appreciated.” Listen look and learn. Aggarwal arms herself with photos and facts to make food allergies relatable. Her sons school had a policy of storing medications only in the office. To persuade the staff to keep her sons asthma inhaler and epinephrine autoinjector in the classroom Aggarwal presented concrete scenarios—for example what if he had an allergic reaction or began wheezing during an extended lockdown? She also showed photos of her sons hives and swollen eyes after he accidentally touched mayonnaise. “That garnered empathy from teachers” Aggarwal says. “They were like “Oh my God that looks very scary.”” Seek out opportunities to educate. If you volunteer in the classroom make an effort to learn about the unique situation of each child with a food allergy Aggarwal suggests. “Be the liaison who coordinates food-related activities at class parties and emails the class about allergens and safe brands and products.” Become the cafeteria lunch buddy. Even if a childs school reserves a lunch table for kids with allergies it doesnt mean they dont feel alone or different. “This is my daughters first year eating lunch at school” says Ellen Polston of Rocky River Ohio. “The moms of two of her friends decided to not pack my daughters allergens in their daughters lunches so she would always have friends to sit next to.” AT PARTIES AND PLAYDATES Share the menu ahead of time. “Other families have been so supportive by notifying us about what foods will be served at birthday parties—not so we do or dont go based on our allergens but so I can send along an appropriate replacement” says Katie Price of Portland Oregon. “Im so grateful when friends give me the heads-up so we can prepare and my 4-year-old son doesnt feel left out.” Offer one safe snack. “This happens disappointingly rarely and can be as simple as changing the snack to one the allergic child can eat” says Christine Anna a New York City mom whose son is allergic to dairy tree nuts and sunflower seeds. “It makes such a difference for our children to feel included.” Hand out nonfood treats. Many schools have already banned or heavily restricted food at school parties. If yours has not consider replacing food-based prizes with puzzles stickers and small toys. This is particularly helpful if multiple kids have different food allergies says Nili Patel a mom of two in Raleigh North Carolina. ON PLAYGROUNDS AND AIRPLANES Wash hands and wipe tables after eating. This could help protect others from accidentally exposing themselves to food allergens through crumbs and oils—especially people with so many allergies that its hard to avoid all problematic foods says Amy DiElsi of Malvern Pennsylvania whose son is allergic to wheat eggs milk peanuts tree nuts and sesame. (This habit is of course good protection against viruses bacteria and irritants as well.) Another tip: Teach your kids to eat at designated tables rather than on playground equipment. ONE IN 10 U.S. ADULTS HAVE A FOOD ALLERGY. More than 25 percent said they werent allergic to foods as children. ONE IN 13 U.S. KIDS UNDER AGE 18 HAVE A FOOD ALLERGY. Thats almost 8 percent of all children in the country. THE RATE OF FOOD ALLERGIES AMONG KIDS HAS DOUBLED in the last two decades. PREVENT ALLERGIES WITH EARLY INTRODUCTION Parents used to be advised not to feed babies peanut products and other top allergens until age 1 or 2. But in the past five years large rigorous clinical trials have shown that early introduction of peanuts reduces the chance of developing an allergy; other trials support the early introduction of eggs and milk. These findings “turned everything upside down” says Erika Cravanas MD a pediatrician in Louisville Kentucky. Now she and other doctors urge parents to feed babies peanut products and other potential allergens early and consistently starting as young as 4 to 6 months. This is an especially good move for babies with egg allergies or eczema who are at high risk of developing more allergies. If the eczema is severe though consult a doctor to make sure your child doesnt already have a particular food allergy before you introduce the allergen says Hugh A. Sampson MD an allergist and professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. SEE A FOOD ALLERGY EXPERT Blood and skin-prick tests can be tricky to interpret. About half the time the tests “could be positive but if you actually ate the food you wouldnt react” says allergist Tina Sindher MD clinical assistant professor of allergy and immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine. This can make people cut out foods needlessly. Bottom line: Find an informed allergist to help you navigate the diagnosis. USE DISCRETION WITH SOCIAL MEDIA Support groups can be beneficial. But since theyre often populated by people who need help you may not hear as much from people who are successfully managing their food allergies and doing well says Sakina Bajowala MD of Kaneland Allergy & Asthma Center in North Aurora Illinois. “You are more likely to get a bit of a skewed perspective because you tend to see worst-case scenarios.” EXPLORE TREATMENT OPTIONS Oral immunotherapy (OIT) involves ingesting a culprit food such as peanuts eggs tree nuts milk wheat or shellfish daily to desensitize immune cells. The only FDA-approved food allergy treatment—Aimmune Therapeutics peanut-flour capsules called Palforzia—is a form of OIT. A small number of allergists have developed OIT regimens using commercial food products. For some families gaining the ability to safely eat one or two peanuts for example can be transformative. Before her daughters did OIT Jessika Welcome of San Carlos California says they had to “stay away from any food labels that said “may contain” or “made on shared equipment”—which rules out a lot of stuff.” After OIT they “could ignore those warnings. It opened up Halloween in a whole different way.”

Requirements: | .doc file | Discussion | 1 pages Single spaced

Include In your discussion: a statement of the issue and why it is important (i.e. why is it a problem how many are impacted bad outcomes etc.; in other words give some context to define and illustrate the issue) a clear statement of your viewpoint identify evidence to support your perspective (remember to cite and reference throughout your post as needed) AND provide clear statements to refute/rebut the opposing opinion on the topic. FOOD ALLERGIES BY THE NUMBERS TIPS FOR FOOD ALLERGY PARENTS FOOD ALLERGIES BY THE NUMBERSTIPS FOR FOOD ALLERGY PARENTS

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more
Open chat
1
You can contact our live agent via WhatsApp! Via + 1 3234125597

Feel free to ask questions, clarifications, or discounts available when placing an order.

Order your essay today and save 25% with the discount code GURUH